English Dictionaries and New Words

English Dictionaries and New Words

English Dictionaries and New Words

The English word “tweet,” which used to mean “to chirp” so far, will now officially take on a new meaning: “post on Twitter” according to a new edition of the Merriam-Webster University Dictionary. The new words and internet slang in included in other English dictionaries also. Does it mean the traditional or academic English language is going to die? Well, not exactly. Language is a living organism, but internet slang fundamentally changes human communication and even comes down to normative dictionaries.

English Dictionaries and New Words
English Dictionaries and New Words

Merriam-Webster Dictionary

A new edition of this dictionary officially recognizes the new meanings of tweet, which can be used as a noun to describe a Twitter message or as a verb to describe its publication. Over 100 other new terms have also been added to the dictionary. Tweet has been included along with other innovators describing a variety of things from the latest advances in technology to the subtle nuances of family or social relationships.

Piter Sokolovski, editor-in-chief of the Merriam-Webster dictionary, says that even if many people are not interested in Twitter and the ability to create their own account, they will now be able to find out what tweet means, as a result, that was the main reason why the word appeared in the dictionary.

Oxford Dictionary

Meanwhile, the London-based Oxford English Dictionary has also acknowledged the growing popularity of the social network by including the word “retweet” and other new technology-related terms such as ‘cyberbullying’ in its concise edition this summer, which has already found its place in Merriam. Webster’s dictionary.

The compilers of the Oxford English Dictionary also have announced the inclusion of over a thousand other new words and expressions and the revision of almost 2,000 previous records. Some of the more interesting vocabulary innovations are the following: glamping (luxury camping), listicle (online article provided as a list), budgie smugglers, ROFL (Rolling on the Floor Laughing), MOOC (Massive Online Open Course). Well, the name says “tl; dr”, which is an abbreviation of the words “too long, didn’t read” by presenting the essence of a long post or by suggesting that the comment itself may not be on topic.

Oxford Dictionary
Oxford Dictionary

The abbreviation “OMG!“ (Oh my God), which is often used by internet users, has been included in the official Oxford English Dictionary also. Other abbreviations that have been added to the updated online dictionary of Oxford includes such words as LOL (laughing out loud), IMHO (in my humble), and BFF (best friends forever). According to the compilers of the dictionary, although these phrases are associated with the modern language of the internet and virtual society, some of them originated a very long time ago. For example, the phrase “OMG!” was first used in a letter written in 1917. Not all phrases in the dictionary came from the Internet. The phrase WAG (“wives and girlfriends”) is also included in the dictionary. The phrase was first used in 2002 to refer to the second half of famous football players. In total, about 900 new terms were added to the dictionary.

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